TRX Scapulothoracic Glide

TRX Scapulothoracic Glide

TRX Scapulothoracic Glide

Written by Dr. Matt Wiest, DC

The Shoulder complex is an intricate system compromised of 4 joints. The Glenohumeral Joint, The Acromioclavicular Joint, The Sternoclavicular Joint, and the Scapulothoracic Joint. As with every joint, there needs to be a balance between structural sturdiness and fluid range of motion. Today we are going to focus on the Scapulaothoracic Joint and the importance of stabilizing this joint in order to optimize function of the shoulder complex.

Unlike the hip, the other major ball and socket joint in the human body, the glenohumeral joint is very shallow and requires assistance in stabilization. Rarely do you hear of someone dislocating their hip joint without trauma, however dysfunction of the shoulder complex is very common, especially as cultural demands continue to force our bodies to become anterior dominant. Picture your glenohumeral joint as a golf ball on a tee, without some additional support, it is pretty easy for structural stability to be lost. That’s where the scapulothoracic joint comes into play. This joint is compromised of the anterior surface of the scapula gliding over the convex posterior surface of the rib cage. The muscles that help to promote this optimal glide are the middle and lower trapezius muscles. When this are inhibited the scapula will tend to protract and become elevated leaving the glenohumeral joint vulnerable to instability and injury. Focused exercises that will facilitate these muscles are pivotal in protecting the shoulder and maintaining optimal movement.

Exercises:

Single Arm TRX Rows

Stack your pelvis over your rib cage, place your weight in your heels and have your legs at about a 45 degree incline from the floor while holding the TRX bands in one hand. Complete ten rows per side while maintaining a strong core to avoid lumbar extension, or hip involvement in the movement. Try to focus of gliding the scapula posterior and medial towards the thoracic spine in order to facilitate the lower trapezius.

Alligator TRX Fly

Stack your pelvis over your rib cage, place your weight in your heels and have your legs at about a 45 degree incline from the floor while holding the TRX bands in each hand. Pull your body weight into an upright position while having one arm opening up into an overhead position and the other hand pressing down next to your same side hip. Use your body weight as resistance.

Inclined TRX Fly

Stack your pelvis over your rib cage, place your weight in your heels and have your legs at about a 45 degree incline from the floor while holding the TRX bands in each hand. Open your arms parallel to the floor into a true fly position.

Dr. Matt Title Card

TRX Bands Photo Credit: wuestenigel TRX: Schlingentraining via photopin (license)